State of Tokyo

State of Tokyo is a rather nice new site by Alex Abian covering the people and places of Tokyo, with beautiful photography throughout. Looks like it’s going to be fun to follow, with coverage of places like Takeo, a tiny little restaurant in Shibuya that is run in the mornings by the pictured Takeo (in the afternoon, it turns into a different restaurant).

Koya Bound, the Website

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You’ll of course remember Koya Bound, the beautiful photography book that Craig Mod and Dan Rubin recently Kickstarted, covering one of the annual (or is it bi-annual) walks that Craig likes to do. Part of the Kickstarter promise was to launch the content of the book as its own website, and that site has now launched. It’s a beautiful thing, with an animated map slowly scrolling as you read about their journey and view the many photos.

Mystery Writers of Japan

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I’m currently in the process of reading Yukito Ayatsuji’s The Decagon House Murders, a mystery novel that was recommended to me by my wife, as Ayatsuji is her favorite mystery novelist. Earlier this year I had done a bit of research about the world of mystery novels in Japan, and Decagon even kicks off with a forward that takes a look at this history. I was very happy to see last month that the Mystery Writers of Japan association — yup, a real association that has quite the pedigree — launched an English website, that shares info on all of the novels that get English translations. A great resource if you’re interested in Japanese mystery novels.

Canvas Updates Creatives Listings

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As you’ve probably noticed, I’m a big fan of the Tokyo creatives community site Canvas, developed by my friend Mark McFarlane — and I daresay that PauseTalk played a small role in inspiring its creation (at least Mark was nice enough to say that). I like regularly going to the “Activity” page to see what projects people are sharing, and now they’ve just done a big redesign of the “Creatives” listing page, making it easier to get a quick taste of what each person does.

Tokyo Soup

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My first reaction when I saw the beautiful new site Tokyo Soup was that, hey, this is what I’ve been trying to do my entire life, but done better. At least on a visual level. Created by Tokyo-based art director Michele Angeloro, it’s a beautiful curated guide to the best that Tokyo has to offer in terms of art and design, presented in a slick and image-heavy package. Definitely something to follow if you’re on the lookout for delicious Tokyo eye candy. Hat tip to my buddy Gueorgui, whose Turbulence zine you should pick up.

Hi and Goodbye

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Earlier this year, the fine folks behind the “moment sharing site” Hi (né Hitotoki) shared some big news: they would shut down the site on September 1, as part of a novel archiving project (here’s what Craig Mod had to say about the “Hitotoki Archives” project). We’re just a few days away from the site shutting down, which means you still have a chance to share a moment or two, that will be preserved on physical media.

I received a notice the other day to download all of my contributions to the site, which I’ve done. I was never a big contributor to the site, but it’s nice to see these shared moments again, and I’m thinking of incorporating them in my blog (as you know, I’m very much in an archival state of mind these days).

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The Magaziner

I gotta say I’m getting a kick out of this: In the past 24 hours I conceived of a site, a name, bought the domain, got it working, installed WordPress, imported posts from this site, found a theme that I modded to my liking, and have now launched my latest project, something I’m calling The Magaziner. What’s a magaziner you ask? Here’s my made-up answer:

We hereby define a new term, that of the magaziner, described as a person who exerts an unhealthy amount of love for all things magazine. The Magaziner is a site that mostly focuses on the intersection between magazines and the digital frontier, and what it means for the medium. This does not preclude the inclusion of a healthy amount of print love.

It all started last night when I was reading a comment on Facebook by Craig Mod, who suggested that all of the magazine-related coverage I’ve been doing over the past couple of months is getting lost within the rest of what I post here. I think he made a good point — and god knows I have a lot of respect and admiration for what he’s accomplished over the past year or so — and so I decided to launch a new site that would be exclusively for all of the magazine stuff. Expect the same kind of coverage you’ve been seeing here — commentary, news, new release announcements, reviews — that weighs heavily on the emerging digital side of the magazine publishing industry, something I’m quite passionate about (although I do still love my lovely print publications, thank you very much).

So this site returns to being a hub for news on me and all of my various projects, which on top of The Magaziner includes Codex, my new weekly music podcast, Radio OK Fred, SNOW Magazine, PauseTalk, and other fun stuff. Hope you’ll continue to follow what I’m up to here, and if you really enjoyed the magazine coverage, then please head on over to The Magaziner — and you can of course subscribe to an RSS feed. There’s a Twitter account too (@the_magaziner) that I’ll be using to post magazine-related news as well.

Oh, and one more thing about The Magaziner, please consider this a beta version of the site. As I said at the top of this post, it all came together rather fast, so over the coming weeks I’m sure I’ll be changing things here and there, fixing things I missed, and maybe coming up with new features or sections to add.