Ancien and the Magic Tablet

I mentioned last year really wanting to see the movie Hirune Hime (seems that the official English title is now Ancien and the Magic Tablet), and here’s a review of the film over at Time Out Tokyo. Considering that it’s directed by Kenji Kamiyama, who was behind Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex and Eden of the East, two series I quite like, I’m definitely in for this.

Koffee Mameya

Omotesando Koffee is back, sorta. I was sad to hear about its closing back in 2015, but Eiichi Kunitomo is not only back with a new shop at the exact same location (in the back streets of Harajuku/Aoyama), but with a twist as well. Koffee Mameya is more interested in selling you beans than serving coffee — you can order a cup to go, but that’s just an aside. Time Out Tokyo has a great piece that features an interview with Kunitomo talking about the new spot.

Edit Tokyo

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I’ve always liked the concept of Shimokitazawa’s B&B (book & beer), and now they’re expanding with a temporary (until March of next year) space in Ginza under the name Edit Tokyo, on the 6th floor of the Sony Building. The focus will be on publications that focus on Tokyo, and it’ll include a selection of Tokyo-related goods as well. Found via Time Out Tokyo.

Sumida Hokusai Museum

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Opening in Ryogoku this month (on the 22nd, to be exact) is the Sumida Hokusai Museum. Here’s a description from Time Out Tokyo:

Spending a day in Ryogoku is set to become even more of a necessity for tourists from this November, when the neighbourhood that already houses the Edo-Tokyo Museum and the Kokugikan will see the opening of a museum dedicated entirely to Edo-era Sumida’s most famous son – ukiyo-e superstar Katsushika Hokusai. In addition to viewing displays of the woodblock print wizard’s countless masterpieces, you’ll get to learn about Hokusai the man, his life in Sumida and what the city looked like between 1760, when Hokusai was born in Katsushika, and 1849, when he died and was buried at Seikyoji Temple in Asakusa. Visitors will also want to check out the full-scale master’s atelier, a reconstruction based on a painting by Hokusai apprentice Iitsu Tsuyuki.

This Time Out entry includes more details.

50 Tokyo Cafes

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Time Out Tokyo has a list up of what they consider to be the top cafes in Tokyo. It’s quite the decent list — of course, there’s sure to be someone’s favorite missing — and a good place to start if you’re on the lookout for new spots to check out. Nice to see Fuglen (pictured) at #2 — that was my local cafe for the last 2 years of my life in Tokyo. Found via my friend Mio.